Category Archives: NEWS

Whatcom signs new athletes

By Felix Zavisubin

Fourteen student athletes have signed a letter of intent to join Whatcom Community College sports teams in the 2018-2019 academic year.

The signees include seven for women’s soccer, three for women’s basketball and four for men’s basketball. Twelve of the 14 commits attended Washington high schools, two athletes are coming from Alaska.

“We start internally and work outward,” said Chris Scrimsher, Whatcom Athletic Director. “[Whatcom County] is our first target area.” 

According to Scrimsher, the recruiting process relies on the work of the Whatcom coaches who attend high school games and build relationships with local coaches and athletes.

“I was recruited by the [head coach] for soccer at the end of my senior year,” said Lyla Pagnotta a women’s soccer player at Whatcom. “[She] had been my coach for club soccer during my first couple years of high school so we knew each other pretty well.”

The Northwest Athletic Conference determines a geographical area where schools in the conference are able to actively recruit student athletes and offer scholarships.

According to Scrimsher, schools are not allowed to offer scholarship dollars to athletes from high schools outside of Washington, Oregon, Alaska, California, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Hawaii, Utah and Wyoming.

“We can offer up to 65% of tuition,” Scrimsher said. “Each coach has a discretion of how they want to split that up.”

According to Scrimsher, each sport is given an NWAC mandated number of monetary awards to give out. Each of the awards can be split between multiple athletes or given entirely to one.

Whatcom competes with all other NWAC schools when recruiting athletes. In addition to the monetary aspect, there are a variety of other factors athletes must consider when deciding what school to attend.

“I chose Whatcom because I was really impressed by their commitment to their players,” said women’s soccer signee Peyton Schwinger in a Whatcom press release.

Whatcom’s commitment to student athletes manifests itself in a variety of ways. According to Scrimsher, Whatcom is one of the premier community colleges in the NWAC because of it “state of the art” facilities and quality educators.

“The facilities at Whatcom are definitely better than any other school in the conference that we visited to play against,” Pagnotta said.

According to Pagnotta, the gym and turf field at Whatcom are unique, as most schools in the conference had muddy grass fields and old dark weight rooms.

“Whatcom sets the bar pretty high both athletically and educationally,” Schwinger said.

Schwinger will join a women’s soccer team that went 9-5-1 in conference and advanced to postseason play in 2017.

According to Scrimsher, Whatcom judges the success of the athletic programs by looking at individual athletes graduating and moving to the next level, as well as team records.

“If we’re successful and we place them at the next level, then that was a good decision for them to come to Whatcom,” said Scrimsher.

Whatcom had a number of athletes from the past year go on to continue their careers at universities, and sent men’s and women’s soccer and women’s volleyball teams to postseason play.

“I would definitely recommend playing sports at Whatcom to a high school athlete because it gave me opportunities to meet lots of new friends and people and continue to play at a high level and get better,” Pagnotta said.

 

 


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New direction for student senate

 

By: Joe Zimmermann

Whatcom’s Campus is a microcosm of democracy, and as such, it has a governing body of students through which the administration hears the concerns of the students through representatives in student government.

The Associated Students of Whatcom Community College is composed of the Executive Board, the student Senators, the Programming and Diversity Board, and the college community at large. Continue reading New direction for student senate


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Self-censorship a necessary step after student reporter’s actions

By Catherine Wallace

Horizon Advisor and Journalism Adjunct

Last quarter, for the first time in the five years since I’ve been advisor of the Horizon, we had to pull an issue from the racks. That’s a very serious step toward self-censorship and one I hope never to have to repeat.

But before I get into what happened, it’s important to note that my writing this column is also not normal. My role is to advise, not to interfere—unless or until something bad happens.

Well, something bad happened. Continue reading Self-censorship a necessary step after student reporter’s actions


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Whatcom sends students to study abroad

By Kenzo Yamamoto

Scholarships specific to Whatcom Community College allows students to study abroad in five different countries with other community colleges. Future trips include Berlin, Costa Rica, London, and a combined Germany/Poland trip. Faculty members will accompany students and teach the 10-week, 15-credit courses in English.

Each student will receive an internal scholarship which reduces tuition to $25 per credit. Students will be going with other community college students that are a part of the Washington State Community College Consortium for Study Abroad.

In addition to the $25 per credit fee, the consortium also provides two scholarships per program excluding summer. The international programs department at Whatcom was able to find funding to provide two $1,000 scholarships for fall and spring quarter programs, and two $500 scholarships for summer programs.

Ulli Schraml, Associate Director of International Programs, said he encourages faculty members to pitch ideas for short-term programs during the summer that are roughly two to three weeks long.

“Not everyone can afford a 10-week program that’s $8,000 to $10,000, and to have an alternative shorter and cheaper program gives more students the opportunity to experience what learning in another country is like,” Schraml said. “It’s also cheaper to go abroad while you’re at a community college than it is at a four-year university.”

Students desiring to learn more information about  the scholarships can go to Syre 135 2:30 pm to 3:30 pm on Feb 1.

“They will have a panel of students and faculty members alike who have gone on these trips and can answer questions for students who still want to know more about the programs and specific trips,” It’ll be a perfect opportunity for students who are interested in future programs to come and hear about previous student experiences and also faculty input,” Schraml said.

Schraml mentioned that people who don’t feel they have the means to travel abroad, they now have a “meet the world at Whatcom fair” in the Syre foyer on Jan 31, 11 am to 1 pm, where staff tries to motivate international and immigrant students to set up booths with cultural presentations to highlight their cultures.

 Schraml said he highly encourages students to separate themselves from the rest.

“The important thing is to tell the reader why you are different, not only why you want to study abroad, but what’s so different about you. Why should they give it to you and not the next person?” Schraml said. “The more information you provide the better.”


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Chaos or community? Celebrating MLK day

By Joe Zimmermann

In 1968, Martin Luther King was assassinated on a hotel balcony in Memphis, Tenn. and in 1994 a burning cross was placed in a migrant farm in Lynden, Wa.

In response, the community of Bellingham stood in solidarity with the migrants and expressed their concern for local human rights by creating the Whatcom Human Rights Task Force according to the archived history of the Task Force. Continue reading Chaos or community? Celebrating MLK day


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