Tag Archives: Issue 12

L’editor: It feels like we only go backwards

By Apple Parry

When President Donald Trump ran for office, his campaign slogan and anxiety-inducing hats read, “Make America Great Again.” Allow me to translate what it actually says: “I want all my straight white male privilege back.”
On May 8, under the Trump administration, Alabama’s female mayor passed a law banning abortions no matter the circumstances. This includes incest and sexual assault.
On top of that, any doctor who performs an abortion could be sentenced to up to 99 years in prison.
However, if this is the first you’re hearing of this, you’re bound to be unaware that legislators have been doing their best to chip away at abortion rights since they became legal. Continue reading L’editor: It feels like we only go backwards


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Open Space program AIMS to help students

By Katauna Loeuy

The AIM Open Space program at Whatcom Community College provides a drop-in facility for students to connect with one-on-one mentoring or assistance for any aspect of the college experience, including academic help and personal well-being.
Sara Purington, one of three AIM coaches and a Title III Student Completion Specialist, says that AIM, which stands for Achieve Imagine Motivate, is “a space for students to connect with other students.” Continue reading Open Space program AIMS to help students


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Global 6K: Running for clean water

By Eva Mo

The Covenant Kids Congo 6K for Water held by the Bellingham Covenant Church, was held on May 19 at Lake Padden Park.
The main organization of this event is World Vision. They have provided a website for people to register for the event by their own, and World Vision provided everything including decorations, signage, and mile markers.
The purpose of the event is to help fund water projects in communities where World Vision works. Therefore, each participant needs to pay $50 registration fee, which provides life-changing clean water for one person.
This year the church raised over $5,000 for the event, and there were over a hundred participants for the event this year, including 10 Whatcom Community College students from the Impact club.
Impact club provides the opportunity to make positive change in the community, through the voices and concerns of each member.
“I know that there are a lot of runners on campus,” said Rose Adam, the president of Impact club.
Due to county limitations, only a certain amount of people can run in the race. Therefor the church offered 25 spots for Whatcom students.
Steven Shetterly one of the organizers of the church, who helped set up the event mentioned that World Vision has sites around the world in hundreds of different countries.
Last year, 48,000 people around the world walked and ran this 6K in order to to bring clean water to over 63,000 people in need.
“It’s a very special event for our church,” said Shetterly.  “Our church has been working in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in Africa for over 80 years.”
According to a new report from UNICEF and the World Health Organization, 2.1 billion people around the world drink unsafe water every day. The task of providing water for households, falls disproportionately to women and girls, especially in rural areas.
Hannah Cranny, another organizer said that people who donate “generally are helping the girls at the same time,” because more girls are able to attend school.
“To able to attend schools and get more educated, better education for women basically in these communities,” said Cranny.
BarBat Goebal, one of the participants in the event said, “Most of us don’t even think about other people who are suffering in finding clean water, but we just turn on the tap.”
Another purpose of the event was to help people put themselves in someone else’s shoes, by going their distance.
The race runs six kilometers to represent the average distance a person in the developing world must walk to find water, which is often contaminated with life-threatening diseases.
“I think the church really enjoyed working with us this year,” said Adam. “We might have a partnership with the church again next year.”


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Review: Bundy continues to manipulate in new film

By Madison Roper

If you are unfamiliar with Ted Bundy, he was one of the most notorious serial killers in America. He was convicted of killing at least 30 women in multiple states in the 1970s.
This past January was the 30-year anniversary of Bundy’s execution for the murders. The anniversary seemed to have created an influx of interest in him.
A part of it was the documentary, “Conversations with a Killer: The Ted Bundy Tapes,” and a movie, “Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile,” starring Zac Efron as Bundy. Both are Netflix Originals.
The documentary presented tape audio of Bundy that had never been heard by the public before, it keeps things factual and thorough.
“Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile” had a much different take. Continue reading Review: Bundy continues to manipulate in new film


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‘REDress Project’ on display at Whatcom

By Madison Roper

Five red dresses in front of Baker Hall are meant to bring attention to the missing or murdered aboriginal women of Canada.
The REDress Project, a project created by artist Jaime Black in 2011 was installed May 19.
“It is an installation art project, based on an aesthetic response to this critical national issue,” said Black, on the project website.
“Through the installation I hope to draw attention to the gendered and racialized nature of violent crimes against Aboriginal women, and to evoke a presence through the marking of absence.” Continue reading ‘REDress Project’ on display at Whatcom


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