Tag Archives: Eva Mo

Opinion: 30 years after Tiananmen, Hong Kong freedom at stake

By Eva Mo

What is home for you? A place that makes you feel comfortable, a place that holds everything you love, or a place that helps you grow?
As an international student who has studied at Whatcom for two and a half years, I hadn’t gone back to my home country until last December.
I must confess that I was a little bit afraid of going back Hong Kong, because I know that it has changed a lot in these last two years.
Not just the environment in Hong Kong, but the people and the status.
As a Hong Konger, I always think about what it is that my home country really needs. To be independent? To uphold our freedom, human rights and the rule of law till the end? Or to obey China unwillingly? Continue reading Opinion: 30 years after Tiananmen, Hong Kong freedom at stake


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Learning contracts give students academic flexibility

By Eva Mo

For students who are interested in self-learning, Whatcom Community College offers a Learning Contract that will design individual course content, or possibly take a course from the catalog for students.
This means students can have more control over their learning, such as negotiating the pace of learning, the learning methods and evaluation with a self-designed contract.   Continue reading Learning contracts give students academic flexibility


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Global 6K: Running for clean water

By Eva Mo

The Covenant Kids Congo 6K for Water held by the Bellingham Covenant Church, was held on May 19 at Lake Padden Park.
The main organization of this event is World Vision. They have provided a website for people to register for the event by their own, and World Vision provided everything including decorations, signage, and mile markers.
The purpose of the event is to help fund water projects in communities where World Vision works. Therefore, each participant needs to pay $50 registration fee, which provides life-changing clean water for one person.
This year the church raised over $5,000 for the event, and there were over a hundred participants for the event this year, including 10 Whatcom Community College students from the Impact club.
Impact club provides the opportunity to make positive change in the community, through the voices and concerns of each member.
“I know that there are a lot of runners on campus,” said Rose Adam, the president of Impact club.
Due to county limitations, only a certain amount of people can run in the race. Therefor the church offered 25 spots for Whatcom students.
Steven Shetterly one of the organizers of the church, who helped set up the event mentioned that World Vision has sites around the world in hundreds of different countries.
Last year, 48,000 people around the world walked and ran this 6K in order to to bring clean water to over 63,000 people in need.
“It’s a very special event for our church,” said Shetterly.  “Our church has been working in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in Africa for over 80 years.”
According to a new report from UNICEF and the World Health Organization, 2.1 billion people around the world drink unsafe water every day. The task of providing water for households, falls disproportionately to women and girls, especially in rural areas.
Hannah Cranny, another organizer said that people who donate “generally are helping the girls at the same time,” because more girls are able to attend school.
“To able to attend schools and get more educated, better education for women basically in these communities,” said Cranny.
BarBat Goebal, one of the participants in the event said, “Most of us don’t even think about other people who are suffering in finding clean water, but we just turn on the tap.”
Another purpose of the event was to help people put themselves in someone else’s shoes, by going their distance.
The race runs six kilometers to represent the average distance a person in the developing world must walk to find water, which is often contaminated with life-threatening diseases.
“I think the church really enjoyed working with us this year,” said Adam. “We might have a partnership with the church again next year.”


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Foreign exchange students showcase cultures

By Eva Mo

The Whatcom Office Student Life and Development hosted the Global Cultural Night on May 2 to celebrate the cultural diversity on campus.
“We wanted to share cultural diversity on campus to Whatcom Community, build a campus community that celebrates diversity, and hope students make new friends on the event,” said Muhammad Adib Thaqif Taufe, the Associated Students of Whatcom Community College director for Campus Collaborative Programing.
Most students who went to the event thought that it related with the International Week that is held every quarter, however Student Life decided to hold two separate events to showcase the diverse student community.

Continue reading Foreign exchange students showcase cultures


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Visions and Voices highlights women in film

By Eva Mo

Film is indispensable in this visual media society, no matter in this generation or in the past. However, in the ever-augmenting filmmaker’s world, women haven’t been seen during the age of silent film, and not many people are aware of women filmmakers.

The CASCADIA International Women’s Film Festival is a local platform for women filmmakers to show their works to the public. They are currently holding Visions & Voices: Forgotten Films from Cinema’s Women Directors in Bellingham through March.

The organization has also been holding the Women’s Film Festival since 2015. This year it will be held on April 11-14, at the Pickford Film Center and the Mt. Baker Theatre.

Dr. Susan Lonac is an advisory member of CASCADIA and English and Film professor at Whatcom Community College. As a professor, she specializes in American women filmmakers, American LGBTQ+ filmmakers, and film adaptation. Lonac is helping to organize the Visions and Voices event this year.

“Pioneers: First Women Filmmakers” is a collection of historical films, produced by the Kino Lorber distribution company and the Library of Congress, released last November. The films are directed by seven different early women filmmakers: Alice Guy-Blaché, Lois Weber, Helen Holmes, Mabel Normand, Grace Cunard and Dorothy Davenport Reid.

“The inspiration of this event was the release of a six-disc set of early women filmmakers’ movies,” Lonac said. “On that set are some films that have not been seen by the public since they were first released, during the age of silent film.”

According to the CASCADIA website, the four-part series includes a variety of features and short films ranging from slapstick comedies to melodramas and thrillers from female directors.

The first two events have already been shown Dec. 2, and Jan. 6. For these events, they showed influential director Lois Weber’s “The Blot” (1921), and “Salome” (1923), starring Alla Nazimova, a pioneering lesbian actress.

Lonac mentioned many of the films were over 100 years old, but that not many people are aware of those films or other work from early women filmmakers. Also, it is too often that women in history are erased, she said.

“The purpose of the event is to help people discover the work of early women directors in America,” Lonac said.

The remaining shows will be held Sunday, Feb. 10 at 2 p.m. at Mt. Baker Theatre, 104 N. Commercial St., and Friday, March 8 at 7 p.m. at Firehouse Café, 1315 Harris Ave.

Tickets are available through brownpapertickets.com. More information about the festival is available at cascadiafilmfest.org.


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