When freedom of the press is not what law enforcement wants to hear

In the past two weeks, the coronavirus toll in the U.S. surpassed 100,000 deaths, people around the world protested against the killing of George Floyd, and more than 400 journalists have had their First Amendment rights infringed upon.

The unjustified deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery, sparked a series of protests beginning on May 26 all over the country and the world. Since that first day, journalists have had their voices and their rights stripped away as police officers everywhere threaten, arrest, and physically attack them for covering these protests.

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Passing the time in a pandemic is all fun and games

As the pandemic continues, people have been forced to be creative and develop new ways to get together apart.

 In an effort to stay connected and ditch the gloomy COVID cloud hanging over everyone’s head, Kulshan Brewing Co. has moved its regular trivia night online.

While veterans of this weekly tradition have the in-person application down, the transition to online has proved to be somewhat difficult.

“There have been some kinks to work out,” said Whatcom Community College student and Kulshan trivia host Dylan Albrecht.

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Equality is not enough

Imagine you are facing a wall with two friends. This wall is 7 feet tall. You are about 6-foot-2 and your friends are 5-foot-10 and 5-foot-2. You need a stool to see over the wall, so you get yourself a box that is 10 inches tall. The principle of equality would say that this same box should be provided for your two friends as well, and that is sufficient. You all are provided the same materials to do the same task. Is this not fair?

This method of doling out boxes according to the principle of equality does not work. Clearly, if you are any good at mental math, you know that it is only you who can see over the wall. Your friends, having different needs in accordance with their heights, are still stuck staring at bricks.

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WCC Health and Wellness Services during COVID-19

Whatcom Community College’s Health and Wellness Committee will not be meeting this quarter due to necessary social distancing, but this does not mean the end of student aimed resources, says a partner and developer of Whatcom’s Orca Food Pantry.

Catherine Chambers is an AmeriCorps Vista who has been partnered with Whatcom’s Student Life and Development Office, working to explore what student hunger means for our college community.

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Whatcom community forced to chart new territory online

As conditions with the Covid-19 virus took the world by storm, all non-essential local businesses have been ordered closed.

This immediate change left little time for any transition, and students were thrown right into it. Teachers were not immune.

“I’m learning from the experience,” said Whatcom Community College drama instructor Gerald Large. “One thing, for instance, is the Drama 110 Production class. Live on stage, I’m focused on getting the play on its feet for performing in front of a live audience. Putting it online, I’m forced to focus more on analysis.”

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The official student newspaper of Whatcom Community College in Bellingham, Washington