Category Archives: OPINIONS

Throwaway to gourmet; dealing with America’s food waste

By: Kai Vieira da Rosa

Americans love food. Food culture has become integrated into the American psyche. Aside from eating food, we write about it, we travel for it, and we accessorize our love for it on our clothes and hats. Now it seems eating has changed from a primal instinct to a mere recreational event that Americans often take for granted.

The ability to have a variety of food at one’s fingertips is a luxury, but it comes with a cost. Food is wasted at an amazing rate in the United States, dwarfing all other countries. Continue reading Throwaway to gourmet; dealing with America’s food waste


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Is it really about the music anymore?

By: Shelby Ford

Women are empowered and speaking out against the dark side of the entertainment industry, confronting some of the most powerful men in Hollywood with allegations of harassment and sexual assault. The movement Time’s Up was created in support of this action by over 300 women in the industry.

We’re seeing more and more celebrities use popular award shows as a platform to address issues such as sexual harassment and inequality of race and gender. By using award shows like the Grammys, Golden Globes and Oscars, celebrities can influence viewers. Continue reading Is it really about the music anymore?


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Self-censorship a necessary step after student reporter’s actions

By Catherine Wallace

Horizon Advisor and Journalism Adjunct

Last quarter, for the first time in the five years since I’ve been advisor of the Horizon, we had to pull an issue from the racks. That’s a very serious step toward self-censorship and one I hope never to have to repeat.

But before I get into what happened, it’s important to note that my writing this column is also not normal. My role is to advise, not to interfere—unless or until something bad happens.

Well, something bad happened. Continue reading Self-censorship a necessary step after student reporter’s actions


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In light of controversy student journalism remains critical

By Kai Vieira da Rosa

On the final issue of winter quarter, the Horizon pulled their last paper from school circulation. The articles pulled were not meant to be malicious or misleading in any way, but sometimes mistakes are made.

Here at the horizon, every mistake is a new learning opportunity for the staff. This mishap brings to light the importance of student journalist being executed the correct way. Newspaper productions classes, like The Horizon, are an extremely important part of learning to become a journalist.

When errors are made, the people affected often look on the negative side of the situation and question the purpose or benefit of the production. This has been seen many times with the conflict between our president and the media. The criticism received often diminishes the credibility of a production, making journalism appear less important in the eyes of the public.

As a result, funding cuts in community college newspaper productions are occurring nationally and locally. President Donald Trump’s budget plan remove funding for public media is something journalist should be wary of. National Public Radio Brian Naylor reported  “President Trump’s proposed budget calls for big cuts in a wide array of domestic programs — among them, agencies that fund the arts, humanities and public media.”

This is a major step backwards on the road to recovering the distrust between the government and the media. The government decides to cut the budget on one of the best ways of training there is at the worst possible time. The distrust our government has with the media is higher than ever, yet teaching trusting reporters is not a priority.

On a local level, Whatcom has been steadily cutting The Horizon Newspaper budget. In fact, in the last year the budget dropped from $19,950 to $18,500 according to The Associated Students of Whatcom Community College 17-18 S&A Fee Budget table.

The importance of college run newspapers is clear for many reasons. Student run papers in community college gives budding journalists a place to put their writing into something they can be proud of.

Student newspapers teach the essential skills needed in the work force by giving the students real life situations. One on one interviews and conference interviews give a look as to what a career in journalism could be. Learning how to write in AP style can be a refreshing change from the fundamental APA or MLA classes. Valuable lessons are learned in theses production classes.

Some people say that print media is dying. Although this does seem true, it is still important for students of journalism to learn its ways. Newspaper production classes are closest thing a student can get to a real, professional paper. It is important to remember that these papers are typically run solely by students who are all still learning, so mistakes happen. Even though some of them aren’t perfect every time, college productions can still be a credible source of information about your school.


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Letter to the editor: STEM replies to group work

Dear Editor,

As faculty of the STEM division, we strongly disagree with the recent letter from the editor in the Horizon issue (October 24, 2017). It’s nice to talk about one’s personal experiences with regards to group work, but as Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math faculty, we’d like to talk about the data and the research behind learning. The editor argues that group work isn’t appropriate for the STEM domain because it would be better to, “get the most accurate information the most efficient way possible” in order to prevent the “spread [of] inaccurate information while giving teachers a break.” While learning wrong information can be detrimental, there is overwhelming evidence that group work, active learning strategies and working through content with your peers is the MOST effective way of learning the content. Continue reading Letter to the editor: STEM replies to group work


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