Category Archives: FEATURES

Meet the players:

Photos and interviews by Matt Benoit and Henry Wesson

Horizon Editor & Horizon Reporter


Matt Peterson, 20, Center


What originally got you interested in basketball?

“My dad encouraged me to play when I was in the third grade.”

How do you feel about the season so far?

“I think it’s going really well so far.”

What would you like to see happen with the rest of the season?

“I’d like to see us get first in the league so we can place in the tournament.”

What is your favorite thing to eat before a game?

“Everything.”

Any pre-game rituals you have?

“I always have music with me. And gum.”

What do you like to do to celebrate a win?

“Be with my team afterwards. We usually go out to eat afterwards.”

Do you have any nicknames?

“The Dragon,” or “Phat Matt.”

Any plans to further your career in the sport?

“I definitely want to play at a four-year school, hopefully on scholarship.”

Paul Jones, 20, Guard


What originally got you interested in basketball?

“I have been playing since I was a little kid. I just picked up a basketball and started to play.”

How do you feel about the season so far?

“I feel the season’s going good so far…we’re on the right track.”

What would you like to see happen with the rest of the season?

“I’d like to see us stay confident and focus for the games ahead.”

What is your favorite thing to eat before a game?

“I usually like a McDonald’s McChicken.”

Any pre-game rituals you have?

“I’m always listening to music; have a quick snack.”

What do you do to celebrate a win?

“Go home and chill.”

Do you have any nicknames?

“P-weez.”

Any plans to further your career in the sport?

“I look forward to playing at the next level…Collegiate level. That’s…my goal.”

Elon Langston, 22, Point Guard


What originally got you interested in basketball?

“I started playing in the third grade. My dad was the coach.”

How do you feel about the season so far?

“I thought we would be undefeated, but we’re making our way back up to our potential.”

What would you like to see happen with the rest of the season?

“I’d like to see us keep our foot on the pedal for the rest of the season. We can’t stop ‘till we get first place.”

What is your favorite thing to eat before a game?

“A Subway five-dollar foot-long.”

Any pre-game rituals you have?

“Take a long shower, think about the game, listen to music.”

What do you do to celebrate a win?

“Go chill with my teammates [or] roommates. Depends on the day.”

Do you have any nicknames?

“No nicknames. People just call me ‘E’.”

Any plans to further your career in the sport?

“Hoping to go to university after this year. I’m just trying to focus on the season right now.”



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Letter to the Editor

Abortion is a terribly complex interweaving of lives, and choices.  Is there a way to affirm a woman’s life and choices, and protect her baby’s chance at both?

 Because women are incredible.  I married one who is changing the world one friend at a time. 

 And I love babies. I have a spring-loaded 9-month-old who gives new meaning to “smiling from ear to ear” whenever you pick him up. 

 So what am I supposed to do about the lives and choices involved in abortions?

 It’s tricky because there are victims at every level.  Sometimes pregnancy isn’t the woman’s choice at all.  And if they were bullied or frightened or shamed into it, even the abortion may not be their choice.   Abortion doctors are insulted, and assaulted – even murdered.  There are victims all around.  And yet, we’re talking about real live babies here.  They’re not part of the mother’s body – they’re just beautifully housed there.  They have their own brain waves and blood type.  From the size of a sesame seed, my son had a heart beat. 

 So what do we do? 

 First, I think we dialogue.  On Monday, Feb. 22, we aired a Law & Order episode raising questions about abortion, and discussed it afterward.  Hopefully it was helpful.

 And we mourn the victims.  On Thursday, Feb. 25, we will hold a public memorial service in the Syre Student Center Courtyard for the one-in-five babies aborted in the last two years in Whatcom County.  Please join us every class break to mourn the deaths of all those little ones, and to mourn the complex, sometimes awful, circumstances that led their mothers to choose to abort them. 

 Shouldn’t we be pro-momma’s-life as much as anyone’s, and pro-baby’s-choice at the same time? 

-Geoff Mumley


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The Many Faces of Work Study

By Reed Klein

You might not notice a Work Study student around campus, but they are everywhere. The library, the copy center, the registration office – Work Study offers job positions at these places and more for students who wish to work on campus.

The reason you may not notice them is because they are so well integrated into their jobs. The offices they work in would have tremendous labor if not for Work Study.

Governor Gregoire’s budget proposal plans to cut the program. To one Work Study student, Kirstina Blake, that is detrimental.

“I’m a first generation college student,” says Blake. The first one in my family to go to college. Statistically I should not be in school. But Work Sudy allows me to do this.” To see who else is affected, here are just some of the other Work Study students at WCC.

[cincopa 10553580]


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Valentine’s Day Celebrations at WCC

By Kelly Sullivan

Valentines made in the school library, Spanish club baking contests and dating games in the cafeteria? Not the usual list of suspects that come to mind when planning your Valentines Day activities. However, this year on the Whatcom campus we found a few thoughtful and creative alternatives besides the usual trips to crowded restaurants, for couples and singles alike.

The annual Dating Game will take place Wednesday, Feb. 10, sponsored by the Activities Committee students. It will be held in the Syre Auditorium from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Prizes will be awarded and students may still sign up in the Student Programs Office on the second floor of Syre.

A “Bellingham chic” option could be the art trading cards made by student members of Whatcom’s Art Awareness Club, WAAC. They are small paper prints that student members will have uniquely created. The club will be selling them on campus for about $1 to $2 apiece, in the Syre Center, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Feb. 10.

For an event to attend with friends or your significant other, the Spanish club is having a celebration on Feb. 16, called “El dia de los enamorados.” There will be arts and crafts, making valentines for friends, family or your partner. There will be a baking contest with prizes for best smelling, best tasting and best presentation. Prizes will be awarded. There will also be games: Love Hangman and Love Pictionary in Spanish. Any and all are welcome, and encouraged to join in the festivities. Show up in Laidlaw 208 at 4 p.m.

More valentine-making will take place in the Library. There will be a table set up with every possible decorative craft imaginable. There will be glitter pens, doilies, markers, construction paper, you name it. The event is sponsored by the Library Marketing Committee. The table will be up from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 11, and on Friday, Feb. 12.

“We like to see smiles on students’ faces and making valentines generates some pretty good grins,” said Library director Linda Lambert. “I still remember this one guy, easily 6-foot, 4 inches, sitting on knees, backpack on his back, gluing on pieces of lace and cut-out hearts on a metallic sheet.”

Sally Sheedy will be running the Valentine’s Day scavenger hunt in the library. It is an opportunity for students to learn about the content of Whatcom’s library, where to find the content, as well as learn some interesting facts about Valentine’s Day. “It should be a no brainer,” promised Sheedy.


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Journals showcase student work

By Lexi Foldenaur

Have you ever felt inclined to share a piece of your art or writing with the rest of your peers? Whatcom Community College has made this possible for students, and has done so since 1995 with “A Gathering of Voices,” a literary compilation of student works, comprised of personal student essays.

On the publication’s Web site, submissions range from an acrylic painting piece to a student memoir about the transition to life in America. Last year about 50 submissions came through the “A Gathering of Voices” mailbox, and about 13 of the submissions were published.

“It’s really, really amazing how good some of the writing is on campus,” said Wayne Robertson, an English teacher and editor of the anthology. Without “A Gathering of Voices,” it is easy for outstanding student work to go unnoticed, he said. Submissions for the publication are based upon student-written essays that are in most cases nominated by a faculty member. Students are more than welcome to submit their own writing too, however. There is a diverse range of topics in the publication, from science-based essays to opinion pieces. “A Gathering of Voices” emphasizes work done in classrooms around campus, said Robertson.

Guidelines for submission are stated on the program’s Web site as being “outstanding works” submitted by students. Submission content can be anything from a work of creative non-fiction pieces to an outstanding lab report. Students should feel comfortable submitting essays from all different subjects, Robertson said.

Similar to the “A Gathering of Voices,” the “Noisy Water Review” is another student-based publication that gives creative outlet to student work. The name, “Noisy Water,” comes from the meaning of Whatcom in the Coastal Salish language, which is translated “Where the waters are noisy with the sounds of falls and frogs.”

The Literature Club oversees the composition of “Noisy Water Review,” led by its editor, Lori Martindale. The club currently receives one to two submissions each week, says Martindale. For those students who might have something to submit, but are hesitant about doing so, the club said that anonymity is completely welcome in the publication.

“We are trying to make them as comfortable as possible,” said club president Ashley Adams. The club looks for poetry that is carefully crafted, and that has been revised and edited. One of the main things the club looks for when reviewing submissions is that the poem seeks to communicate to the reader, said club member Jordan Meyers.

The creator of the “Noisy Water Review,” Jeffrey Klausman, originally produced the review to connect to his creative writing students. Klausman explained that when the first issue was put out in 1999, they had limited resources to work with because there were no finances for it. The 1999-2000 issue is simple looking, and constructed with paper, ink, and staples. Inside, however, the book is filled with raw and meaningful poetry.

“We’re not trying to be cutting-edge by any means,” said Klausman. The publication is meant to be a broad representation of concise work, he explained. In the first publication, not even half of the submissions made it in to the actual book, and entries are usually selected based on preference by the editors.

“Whatever bruised feelings you may have are smaller than taking that step out of your own little world,” said Klausman, advising students to give it a shot, despite whatever mixed feelings they may initially have about submitting personal works.

If submitting work is maybe not your thing, the literature club said they are always looking for new members to come sit in on a meeting. Martindale likened the atmosphere to being “like a coffee-house club,” where all different ideas and cultural infusions are welcome. Recently, the works of Chinese poet Wang Wei were analyzed. When trying to think of a theme for the next meeting, club member Michael Dalavaccio suggested, “How about bitterness?” he said, adding in a reference to Valentine’s Day, “Because that is the antithesis of love.”

The Literature Club will be accepting applications for winter quarter until March 5. Coming up in June, the club said that the best applicant will receive a $25 gift card to local bookstore Village Books. Submissions can be sent to Lori Martindale at lmartind@whatcom.ctc.edu.


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