Category Archives: EVENTS

Graduates say farewell to Whatcom

By Katauna Loeuy

As the end of the year approaches, students are excited to move on to the next chapter of their lives, but in honor of these milestone moments, a celebration is in order.
Amy Anderson, director of K-12 Partnerships, which includes Running Start, is a volunteer for the Running Start graduation celebration and the Commencement Ceremony at Whatcom Community College.
“The world is full of so many negative things, that to take the time to celebrate the wins and achievement is really exciting,” Anderson said. “It’s the whole community celebrating, it’s everyone taking a night off of their ‘regular lives’ to honor a huge achievement.” Continue reading


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Muslim students share Ramadan experiences

By Elisa Espinoza

The Whatcom Community College Muslim Students Association hosted a dinner in celebration of Ramadan, the month of fasting, which is one of the five pillars of Islam that Muslims follow.
The dinner took place in the Syre Auditorium May 22, from 7:30 to 10 p.m..
Tahani Al-fazel, a student and president of the MSA, said about 160 people attended the event.
She said the dinner’s purpose was “spreading awareness, educating people, being together with other Muslims, breaking our fast and sharing the tradition.”
The dinner initiated with an introduction and a recitation of the first chapter of the Quran. Continue reading


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Drag show represents LGBTQ on campus

By Madison Roper

Whatcom Community College’s Pride Club held a drag show in Syre Auditorium on May 24. Two drag queens, Betty Desire and Shanita Blough, both Whatcom alumni, hosted the event filled with multiple drag performers.
The show raised over $600, which was divided to be donated to Queer Youth Project, PFLAG, Lifelong, and Planned Parenthood.
The drag show was preceded by a Drag Trans Panel with panelists Betty Desire, Autumn Wilfong, Desmond Pounder, Will Cousineau, and facilitator Hannah Thomas.
“That was something important to us as a club and to everyone who was performing because there is a disconnect between the drag and trans community,” said Wilfong of the panel.
“Not necessarily just in the public space, but internally as well and we wanted to bring everyone together beforehand, so it was an important part to the show.” Continue reading


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Global 6K: Running for clean water

By Eva Mo

The Covenant Kids Congo 6K for Water held by the Bellingham Covenant Church, was held on May 19 at Lake Padden Park.
The main organization of this event is World Vision. They have provided a website for people to register for the event by their own, and World Vision provided everything including decorations, signage, and mile markers.
The purpose of the event is to help fund water projects in communities where World Vision works. Therefore, each participant needs to pay $50 registration fee, which provides life-changing clean water for one person.
This year the church raised over $5,000 for the event, and there were over a hundred participants for the event this year, including 10 Whatcom Community College students from the Impact club.
Impact club provides the opportunity to make positive change in the community, through the voices and concerns of each member.
“I know that there are a lot of runners on campus,” said Rose Adam, the president of Impact club.
Due to county limitations, only a certain amount of people can run in the race. Therefor the church offered 25 spots for Whatcom students.
Steven Shetterly one of the organizers of the church, who helped set up the event mentioned that World Vision has sites around the world in hundreds of different countries.
Last year, 48,000 people around the world walked and ran this 6K in order to to bring clean water to over 63,000 people in need.
“It’s a very special event for our church,” said Shetterly.  “Our church has been working in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in Africa for over 80 years.”
According to a new report from UNICEF and the World Health Organization, 2.1 billion people around the world drink unsafe water every day. The task of providing water for households, falls disproportionately to women and girls, especially in rural areas.
Hannah Cranny, another organizer said that people who donate “generally are helping the girls at the same time,” because more girls are able to attend school.
“To able to attend schools and get more educated, better education for women basically in these communities,” said Cranny.
BarBat Goebal, one of the participants in the event said, “Most of us don’t even think about other people who are suffering in finding clean water, but we just turn on the tap.”
Another purpose of the event was to help people put themselves in someone else’s shoes, by going their distance.
The race runs six kilometers to represent the average distance a person in the developing world must walk to find water, which is often contaminated with life-threatening diseases.
“I think the church really enjoyed working with us this year,” said Adam. “We might have a partnership with the church again next year.”


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‘REDress Project’ on display at Whatcom

By Madison Roper

Five red dresses in front of Baker Hall are meant to bring attention to the missing or murdered aboriginal women of Canada.
The REDress Project, a project created by artist Jaime Black in 2011 was installed May 19.
“It is an installation art project, based on an aesthetic response to this critical national issue,” said Black, on the project website.
“Through the installation I hope to draw attention to the gendered and racialized nature of violent crimes against Aboriginal women, and to evoke a presence through the marking of absence.” Continue reading


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