Late Nights at the Library

Getting baked

By Matt Benoit
Horizon Editor

Late Nights at Library returns with extended hours, baked goods for all
Linda Lambert, library director at Whatcom, says her favorite thing to bake is chocolate chip cookies. Always.


“I love chocolate,” she says, adding that her favorite recipe is “chocolate coma cookies,” from a mystery novel by Carolyn Mott Davidson.
Lambert is just one of about a baker’s dozen of library circulation staff, Late Nights at the Library (4)librarians, classified staff, and work study students who can and probably will be baking up a storm of tasty treats for this quarter’s “Late Nights at the Library,” where the library will be open for extended hours in preparation for student finals and projects.
This year’s dates are Dec. 3 and 4, with a second “batch” on Dec. 7 and 8. The library will be open until 10 p.m., 1 hour later than normal hours for the quarter on Mondays through Thursdays, and 5 hours later than normal Friday hours.
Lambert says “Late Nights” have been occurring since 2005, when she had the idea to offer a basic package of ideas summed up in the library’s flyers for the event: cookies, coffee, and librarians. The library would offer extended hours, and, at the same time, cookies and other baked goods.
The event costs $600 each year, and is paid for through the Associated Students of Whatcom.
“I’m making chocolate peanut butter bars,” said Julie Horst, a reference librarian at Whatcom. Horst said the bars have a peanut butter base and are covered with chocolate. “They’re extremely addictive,” she added, mentioning that they’re loaded with fat, sugar, an entire pound of powdered sugar, and she doesn’t even have to actually bake them.Late Nights at the Library
One thing that most of the staff loves to bake are chocolate chip cookies. Kim Struiksma, administrative assistant in the library, makes her grandma’s top secret chocolate, chocolate chip cookies.
Jon McConnel, librarian, bakes chocolate chip cookies because he has a good recipe and, he added, it’s easy. “It’s what I bake for myself; it’s what I bake for the students,” he said.
“I bake my aunt’s recipe for 10-cup cookies,” said circulation desk librarian Linda Compton-Smith. She always makes the recipe, she said, describing the cookies as having a full cup of each of the ingredients—including peanut butter, chocolate, and coconut among others—in each batch.
Laurie Starr, another circulation desk librarian, says her recipes vary. She has made everything from snickerdoodles to double chocolate oatmeal cookies, and is thinking of making salted peanut bar cookies, which she described as butterscotch-like in nature. “It’s always fun,” she said of the baking.
The library usually never runs out of treats altogether, but Lambert said Ara Taylor, who manages the reserves at the circulation desk, has baked up things at home and run them to the library on the few occasions they’ve run short on treats.
Lambert said the one type of baked good seems to be consumed faster than others.
“Brownies always go first,” she said.


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